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Do you think the penalties for Penn State were enough? I don’t. I think PSU should have received the death penalty. Stripping the Lions of those victories in the past is off the point.

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46 Comments

  1. lameduck

    I’ve gone back and forth on this. Today, I agree they aren’t enough because they do not put enough pressure on the guilty parties who remain in their roles to resign or move on to roles in life where they cannot damage others. I was hoping the NCAA penalties would help force / label those responsible. As it stands they school is going to pay out and plan for how to make a comeback.

    I was wondering what the public reaction would have been if it was a Catholic university that committed these crimes.

    July 23rd, 2012 9:18 am

  2. WickedCool

    @lameduck – Among the PSU coaches and administrators, who is still there? The university cleaned house, they’re all gone, or in JoePa’s case, deceased.

    July 23rd, 2012 9:39 am

  3. Paul C. Garrett

    The loss of 20 scholarships is THE Death Penalty for a big time football school. This sets the program back not just the 4 years, but a decade. No top recruit will consider Penn State for very, very long time. Sixty million fine, to help abused kids, love it. This of course, isn’t the only money it will cost the school. Sure they will be paying out millions to the victims.

    July 23rd, 2012 9:43 am

  4. StevenG

    The idea that the NCAA intervened at all is ridiculous. It sets a absurd precedent. I understand this happened in a football program, but this was not a football issue. It is criminal issue and a conspiratorial cover up that took place both inside and outside the football program. Paterno certainly shares the blame, so take down his statue. I’m with that. But the National Collegiate ATHLETIC Association has no business Roger Goodelling a university in criminal proceedings. The next time a college player or coach gets busted for a DUI, will the NCAA sanction them too? This isn’t a pro league. Let’s leave the punishment of criminal affairs to criminal proceedings and let the innocent football players at Penn State play ball.

    July 23rd, 2012 9:43 am

  5. lameduck

    Good, How about Mr. 7 AM statue removing president who only announced the statue being removed after it was removed?

    July 23rd, 2012 9:51 am

  6. Sean

    I like the idea that football program profits will go to set up a foundation or such for the victims. However, the NCAA is trivial in these matters. Men are going to jail, one for the rest of his life. Yet the NCAA, a made-up organization to oversee collegiate athletics, has to have their hand in everything.

    This is going to hurt Penn State pretty bad for a long time. You might, however, be surprised at how they do in the next year or two. Look at their recruiting despite all this. What high school QB wouldn’t want to go play for Tom Brady’s QB coach? And Bill O’Brien should be commended for sticking this out.

    July 23rd, 2012 9:58 am

  7. Stan

    It wasn’t any worse then what USC..or even San Jose State under threat had to put up with..less scholarships,no bowl games,stripped of titles. Penn State didn’t have to give up as much as a Heisman Trophy. The NCAA pres. kept harping about the “The football culture” over school.blah,blah…then PROVED that was true with a slap on the wrist.
    Penn State wont win a National Title? that’s the penalty?.they will have to settle a Cal quality team? for child rape???
    Money over morals wins again.

    July 23rd, 2012 10:52 am

  8. Stan

    Stripped of 4 bowls?..that means three months penalty’s for every boy victim raped. That’s fair?

    July 23rd, 2012 11:03 am

  9. Guy

    Taking the wins from Paterno probably has him rolling in his grave and I think if he were alive would hurt him a great deal. That penalty is very appropriate for one of the major criminals in this tragedy. Also from a cynical viewpoint don’t you think the NCAA will be happier that Paterno will come up on TV broadcasts a little less often.

    The NCAA is protecting the brand by stepping in but is most certainly doing the right thing by giving out punishment. I think it is the best thing the NCAA has done in decades.

    July 23rd, 2012 11:25 am

  10. Tiburon Dave

    I think they actually mat have gotten it right…

    $60 Million goes to child abuse organizations…with a stipulation that no funds can be taken from other non revenue sports.

    Loss of scholarships ,post season play and post season revenue from the Big Ten will make it almost impossible to recruit top talent.

    They’re on probation for five years and will be under a microscope every day of those five years.

    Current players are released and can go anywhere that will have them.

    The program and Paterno lose their place in the record books.

    If they behave they get to exist as Northwestern does in the Big Ten…if not the death penalty is waiting…

    I think they got it right…

    July 23rd, 2012 11:29 am

  11. Dave T

    StevenG, you could not have said it any better at all. The NCAA has far overreached their boundaries here. There job is to govern Student Athletics and what takes place there. I will in now way dispute that this took place and was perpetraited by a member of a University faculty and on school grounds at times, but this is NOT, I repeat NOT and football or athletic program violation. The fact that the NCAA sets this precedent is extremely dangerous and needs to be highly scrutinized and contested in court. In effect the NCAA has said that individuals who commit any crimes that have any relationship to the athletic program in any way will now cause their program of relation to be highly punished. There is no due process here, no system of law. And that flies in the very face of what colleges and universities attempt to impart upon their students, and that includes student athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association needs to stick to what they do, govern student athletics. Penn State gained none, zip, zilch, zero competitive advantage, recruiting advantage or any other advantage from anything that took place at all. The actions of any involved did not translate into wins on the field over the past 13 seasons.

    Again, I as a Penn State Alumni do not condone any of what took place and I am deeply saddened over all of this. My deepest and most sincere thoughts for the victims and their families. But this is not and was not a Athletic Program issue. Yes, facilities were used and employees of the University were involved, but it had nothing to do with college athletics and that is where the NCAA has it all wrong.

    July 23rd, 2012 11:49 am

  12. Dave T

    Now with all I have said, if the State of Pennsylvania wants to punish the University that bears its name and to which ultimately the University answers too, then I have no qualms whatsoever. Lost in this is that colleges and universities are still institutions of higher learning. I played college athletics and had to sit through the NCAA compliance meetings every year. I had to sign papers attesting to my eligibility regarding competeing at the NCAA level. And nowhere in any of that do I recall it governing the actions of staff, athletic or otherwise in regards to NON-ATHLETIC activities or in relation to non students athletes or non students for that matter. Again, not saying that those should go unpunished, simply that the NCAA is out of their boundaries here and that those who should approriately handle punishment are not.

    July 23rd, 2012 11:58 am

  13. KauaiRobert

    I agree with StevenG 100%.
    .
    .
    .
    *ALOHA*

    July 23rd, 2012 11:59 am

  14. Stan

    Also-Penn State hasn’t condemned Joe Paterno. Go down the list of sports crimes..Dog torture,drunk driving killings,shootings,stabbings,major drug dealing, sexual harassment..rape. Now find one team who condemns the action and names the player. Not one. Sports build character?..sports is greed over all. Avarice for wins and the money that follows.
    BUT-dont say a bad word about your employer on FB..or YOU will be punished..

    July 23rd, 2012 12:06 pm

  15. Steve

    I think they got it right, too. I have no problem with the NCAA meting out these penalties, as I think it will be a deterrent for other universities that may be tempted to or already are hiding things. I also hold out hope that it will change the culture of major college sports from a complete money grab to at least some semblance of educational/athletic balance. I know it’s a completely different issue, but note that UC Davis immediately suspended, and will likely fire, two staff doctors who were conducting experiments on terminally ill patients without the University’s knowledge or consent.

    July 23rd, 2012 12:21 pm

  16. Tiburon Dave

    I understand the argument that the NCAA is not the organization to be dealing with this issue. StevenG and Dave T have made several good points.

    The problem in this case is that the head coach, the athletic director, the University President, the Board of Trustees, and heaven knows who else, whiffed on their basic adult responsibilities.

    Some clear eyed adult needed to step in…the NCAA may not be the ideal adult…but in this case they were the only adult willing to do the job…

    July 23rd, 2012 1:06 pm

  17. StevenG

    @Steve –

    This isn’t a different issue at all. If these allegations are true, then persons in a position of authority abused those who could not defend themselves. It’s not sexual abuse, but it is abuse. My question then: does the American Medical Association (or any other agency) have the authority to fine the university and invalidate it’s peer reviewed research for the last 10 years? No. The university will fire these individuals because it is unethical and illegal. The law is on their side and these doctors should lose their licenses as part of the appropriate legal proceedings. Then it’s done. There’s no need, nor precedent, for the NCAA did today.

    (Full disclosure: UCD alum)

    July 23rd, 2012 1:08 pm

  18. Upinc44

    I think they got the penalty right. Taking the statue down and taking the victories away from Paterno was just. The 60 million dollars to fight against child abuse is a great way to make life better going forward

    There is no amount of money that is going to make up for what happened to the victims. We know that each victim will be filing a lawsuit and will get some type of settlement. Hopefully some of the victims who have not spoken up will come forward and get the help they need.

    Taking the scholarships and postseason bans are standard forms of punishment. I like that the NCAA reserves the right to add additional sanctions as more information comes out. I have no sympathy for the hardships that these sanctions will cause for Penn State.

    July 23rd, 2012 1:14 pm

  19. NeverWrong

    Dave T. @ 11:49 a.m. —
    You “as a Penn State Alumni” are not ennobling your school’s reputation. Being deeply saddened is not enough. Try learning English.

    July 23rd, 2012 1:31 pm

  20. B-Rad

    I’m with StevenG, Dave T and Kauai Robert.
    Criminal matters that don’t give the university a competitive advantage should
    be handled by the criminal justice system.
    Financial remuneration by the civil court system.

    Paterno’s dead as a door nail and doesn’t give a rat’s ass that we’re all
    blowing a fuse over this.

    Here’s hoping that James Holmes will be Sandusky’s first roommate.

    July 23rd, 2012 1:34 pm

  21. Tiburon Dave

    I understand the desire to burn the program to the ground…I would have been happy to light the match…but I think the NCAA did it better…

    Without the program there is no $60 Million going to child advocacy organizations…that’s reason enough to keep it alive…

    Sandusky is in the can for life and I hope he soon has the company of those who covered for him…

    We can’t make the victims whole but we can pay them…civil suits will take care of that…

    Fat Cat Alums will live with a stain of inhumanity for a long time…any glory they enjoyed over the past 14 years has been taken and soiled…

    “We are Penn State!” will be a punch line for a decade.

    The University gets the opportunity to put football in its proper place…the innocent are not harmed extensively…all the while with the NCAA watching and waiting to drop the hammer…

    And every university that exists solely to support a football program has a cause for pause…even the SEC…

    July 23rd, 2012 1:39 pm

  22. Lo Sbandato

    Whilst a feel the emotional need for an institutional decapitation, StevenG is right on about the absurdity of the hypocrites at the NCAA getting involved in criminal cases. Given their own tendency to protect their revenue streams until the issues become too obvious for anyone ignore, the parasites at the NCAA should take this opportunity to take a long hard look at themselves and the BS behavior they’re so often willing to indulge as mere “mistakes”. Besides, many of those involved are outside the NCAA’s reach, especially those administrators, who essentially are the NCAA.

    The state of Pennsylvania should be taking the lead in handling any punishment, but there is also a conflict of interest (any fine is essentially fining the taxpayers of Pennsylvania), so the feds will have to carry the legal case (no unmitigated good, the, but that’s how it has to work).

    July 23rd, 2012 1:39 pm

  23. Stan

    Bobby Bowden is right..he just said that without a death penalty Penn States program should recover much faster and that he doubts many players will leave…other schools already have their slots filled. Then this..”The Penn State coach will tell his team to come together and win”. Hows that?..the “penalty’s” are now a motivating reason.
    Penn State should have done a USF in the 80′s,shut down the program and sell off the equipment…let it rest for a few years. The big money won,got its way.

    July 23rd, 2012 1:42 pm

  24. Dave T

    Steve, your point regarding the two UC Davis surgeons is spot on. They are on the staff and should be fired and perpetrated the crime. Now if heaven forbid any administrator knew of it long ago, and there was any tie to the athletic department, then the NCAA should intervene and punish. Or perhaps they should have grant money withheld from other projects where Doctors and surgeons who did not violate anything are also punished and can’t continue their work. That would make complete sense, let’s do that. Punsh those who committed no crime at all and may actually do something to contribute to society. Am I way off base? Well last I checked, most student athletes turn professional in something other than sports. Isn’t that the NCAA commercial they bandy about around NCAA Basketball Tournament time, when more people watch NCAA sports than any other time?

    Again, the point is the University and the Student Athletes gained nothing in this instance. No competitive advantage gained. Allow the courts and the higher powers that govern the conduct of the University do their jobs and the NCAA needs to stick to theirs. The more one thinks about it, the more it makes sense. And remember, a lot of the revenue talked about here goes to a lot of other sports and programs and educational facilities at colleges and universitites. You are not just affecting the football program, but countless young men and women and valuble research being done to better society.

    July 23rd, 2012 1:54 pm

  25. Dave T

    @NeverWrong, if you have ever followed any of my posts here on CohnZone you will find I have quite the grasp of the English language, and if you ever want to sit and discuss the matters at hand, I welcome it. You will also notice I don’t cast stones either. I bring logic, reason and open discussion to the board, as that is what I believe our friend Mr. Cohn has intended to do.

    I do very much like that the fine will go to aid those who are affected by matters such as this. I simply think that such fines should be handed down by the civil court system and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, not by the NCAA.

    July 23rd, 2012 2:03 pm

  26. Stan

    Andy Katz and many others..”Unprecedented” as we all have heard.
    What? the NCAA has never taken away scholarships? Wins?,Bowl games?. or levied fines? Its all very precedent-ed and THAT’S the problem. Its status quo penaltys.
    I just had to post after hearing that for already the umpteenth time.

    July 23rd, 2012 2:06 pm

  27. Dave T

    Oh, and for those who do not know. The Pennsylvania State University is a system of schools, with 20 campuses, most being two year schools, that feed students into one of three four year schools. Not all Penn State alumni attended the University Park campus, which most people refer to as Penn State. I attended a different four year school, yet am still a part of the Pennsylvania State University alumni. Not unlike the UC system, where in fact UC Davis was once upon a time a part of UC Berkley before becoming its own 4 year school. However, the funds gained by all athletic programs went to benefit each of the campuses and students, thus creating an better educational system. The NCAA today overstepped themselves and we should all be wary of what new powers they have created for themselves going forward.

    July 23rd, 2012 2:14 pm

  28. Dave T

    @Stan, the new precedent here is that the NCAA is penalizing a College or University for non athletic related issues. Take away for a moment that Paterno, Sandusky and Curly were a part of the athletic department, the fact here is that none of the acts which were committed were done in relationship to NCAA athletic competition. On the campus, yes. Did Sandusky use his position as a member of the faculty, yes. In any direct connection to the NCAA and any athletic program and competition? Absolutely not. That is the new precedent that is being set, and that is a scary one indeed.

    July 23rd, 2012 2:20 pm

  29. Steve

    Dave T & StevenG,

    UC Davis Administration acted immediately upon discovering the rogue doctors – until proven otherwise, they attest they had no prior knowledge about the experiments. I would hope that the AMA will discipline the two doctors accordingly. If it is revealed that others were involved, then by all means dole out the appropriate punishments.

    Sandusky was allowed to use PSU’s athletic facilities and his status as a former coach to seduce children and commit his crimes for many years. PSU Administration and Paterno covered it up, all the while reaping the benefits of a big-time football program. The NCAA is punishing the football program, nothing else. Reportedly, no other sport or department will be severely impacted by their actions. That’s the simplistic overview; it’s obviously far more complex than that. PSU commissioned the Freeh investigation, agreed with its findings and signed a letter of consent with the NCAA. Believe me, I’m not a card carrying supporter of the NCAA, but that’s why I feel their involvement in this matter is merited.

    Btw, thanks Lowell for broaching this subject and providing a forum for its debate. It’s a lightning rod issue that has little middle ground and passionate and thoughtful arguments on both sides.

    July 23rd, 2012 2:39 pm

  30. Lo Sbandato

    I mentioned it in my previous post, but fining a public institution, especially such a huge amount, is absurd. Putting the taxpayers on the hook to the tune of $60 million, for the malfeasance of a few university employees, is even more unfair than punishing innocent football players. Are university administrators not liable in the same manner as corporate officers? Can an actual lawyer tell us?

    I’m willing to bet there’s going to be many a legal proceeding about whether such a fine handed out by the likes of the NCAA is even collectable. What enforcement power does the NCAA truly have in the real world? The state of Pennsylvania needs to tell them to get bent.

    July 23rd, 2012 2:39 pm

  31. lameduck

    I’m convinced that nobody is happy and that there is no right answer. If I was a student at PSU, all I’d want is that this was over with and to move on, have some parties, meet people oh and get degree. I’d like to think that they are learning a lesson about accountability that they will take with them into there adult lives.

    As far as the football players go, I agree they should play. I’d like to see the entire team go and play for a struggling school and bring them a championship.

    I think the NCAA was OK with taking action because if PSU was lying about the scandal, they could be lying about eligibility or other things. I mean a recruiting violation is nothing in comparison.

    July 23rd, 2012 2:54 pm

  32. Joe H

    Lowell, I agree with you. The “Death Penalty” should have been imposed, even if only for a few years.

    Certainly there would be a considerate amount of collateral damage to the local economy that benefits from Penn State football program and there are so many innocent people who will bear the brunt of the punishment, possibly undeserving.

    But here’s the main reason they didin’t: Money.

    Penn State can be penalized and still make big bucks. They’ve got a pretty nice stadium and, like most big NCAA schools, totally addicted to football money. If they hit them with the death penalty, all that comes crashing down.

    The “news” plays up the NCAA penalty as heavy, but forgiving. I might buy that, since Joe P. is gone and Sandusky appears headed to prison. But the money factor is too large to dismiss.

    Overall, I agree with you and believe a few more heavy penalties against these scofflaws and cheaters who sully our nation’s premier sport. Enough of the Barry Bonds or Saint’s bounty program or Pete Rose’s betting or any other cheater.

    July 23rd, 2012 4:02 pm

  33. Dave T

    Here is a good article I think that sheds some light as well. I hope that we as Alumni and current students rebuild Penn State to be a leader and champion of causes to benefit those in need. Please read it and understand what it says. Colleges and Universities are much much more than sports programs.

    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/ncaaf–penn-state-students-are-sad–mostly-quiet–but-resolve-to-improve-the-school-s-reputation.html

    July 23rd, 2012 5:14 pm

  34. gary

    the student athletes have the opprotunity to
    stay and receive their scholarships, or transfer without penalty.
    Paterno looses his wins record.
    The university takes a major $ hit from
    their sacred cash cow.
    no one will make money from a Penn State bowl game–lets look at the car wreck.
    Excellent work, NCAA, and I sure do not say that often.

    July 23rd, 2012 5:43 pm

  35. CohnZohn

    Dave T, I deeply appreciate your passionate posts about Penn State and I understand why you think the NCAA overstepped its boundaries. It may well have. I want to point out that Penn State never said the NCAA went too far, so your position is different from the school’s.

    July 23rd, 2012 7:47 pm

  36. Dave T

    Lowell, I also noticed that the Administration at Penn State has accepted the penalties in lieu of a four year “death penalty”. They and seemingly many students want to simply move forward and there is some merit in that. The issue at hand is that the sanctions simply do not hit the Football program. The revenue generated goes across the athletic programs and just as importantly, academic programs. The NCAA needed to consider that when levying their punishment. Sadly, ultimately, the difference will in fact not come from a tax payers pocketbook, but from the pockets of those students that choose to attend The Pennsylvania State University. I will be curious to see what happens to tuition costs over the next 5 to 10 years and I would be willing to bet that they increase disproportionately. At the end of the day, it is a institution of higher learning.

    The acceptace on their behalf means they can still generate revenue from hosting home games, meaning not a total loss on that side.

    I simply think the precedent set here is scary across the board. It is granting the NCAA far reaching authority and that will have a huge impact going forward. I want to see all parties heal in this, as much as possible, and move forward.

    Lowell, thank you for putting this out for debate, there are merits on both sides. It is appreciated.

    July 23rd, 2012 8:10 pm

  37. Lo Sbandato

    CohnZohn, we’ll see if PSU sits back and takes it when it’s time to sign that first $12 million check to the NCAA. They could probably win a civil case (the NCAA ignored their own due process procedures, for example). A good reason not to sue, though, is the NCAA’s monopoly: where the hell else could Penn State go? NAIA? Play Canadian schools? Move up to the NFL?

    lameduck, “I think the NCAA was OK with taking action because if PSU was lying about the scandal, they could be lying about eligibility or other things”? That hardly constitutes evidence. It’s not even probable cause.

    July 23rd, 2012 8:35 pm

  38. Lo Sbandato

    Dave T – Students would only have to pay if they’re determined to attend Penn State, which seems much less likely now. Of course, in-state students who had to pay more would be paying a backdoor tax for this “failure of institutional control”. The NCAA seems to be playing God here, maybe they could decree no tuition increases for five years? That sounds like a better punishment.

    On the other hand, Penn State is no technical college in a strip mall. The school supposedly have general funds to the tune $1.8 billion. They can take a hit. Any increase in tuition ascribed to this penalty would mostly be a smokescreen.

    July 24th, 2012 12:38 am

  39. Chris from Santa Rosa

    Dave T, if I’m following your logic here, the NCAA only has jurisdiction over sports/athletic issues, and the penalties they handed down to Penn State were outside the scope of their regulatory powers. Is that right?

    This is the same NCAA that penalizes athletes (who are presumably adults) for hiring people to manage their careers, ie, agents; and who come down hard on athletes who take jobs because their stipends don’t cover their living expenses; and who countenance six- and seven-figure salaries paid to head coaches while their athletes scratch out their meager existences on those previously mentioned stipends.

    Imo, the NCAA is the worst sports governing body in the world, bar none, and (also imo) if they had stayed within the boundaries that you circumscribed, they would be even worse.

    Anyway, Penn State. the NCAA, for that matter.

    July 24th, 2012 6:58 am

  40. Chris from Santa Rosa

    Ha ha, the software did funny things with my last statement. Here it is again, reformatted:

    Anyway, *bleep* Penn State. *Bleep* the NCAA, for that matter.

    July 24th, 2012 7:00 am

  41. Dennis

    I am with StevenG on this one. What Sandusky did did not aid Penn State in winning football games. The NCAA should just stick to their pervue. What happened here is criminal event. The NCAA does not have jurisdiction over crime. Nothing the NCAA did is going to prevent this from happening again. This is just political correctness run amuck

    July 24th, 2012 9:03 am

  42. Dave T

    @Chris, yes the NCAA is the National Collegiate Athletic Association, governing student athletes and competition and student eligibility requirements. Check ncaa.org and see what and who they are. No where does it give them jurisdiction to take punitive measures over criminal and civil matters over non-athletic department issues. The grey area here is that Sandusky was a part of the AD, but was not acting on behalf of it in the capacity of the charity. That is why this decision is a scary and far reaching one.

    @Losobandto I agree, they are no small institution, but the lost revenue will affect not only the football program, but countless other student athletes, men and women and the academic programs. At the end of the day, over 90% of student athletes turn pro in something other than sports.

    July 24th, 2012 12:05 pm

  43. Simon

    It is sickening to see the predominantly Caucasian college students in Penn State University behaving like a bunch of slavish animals in shock after they had been whipped by a dictatorial circus owner for the wrong doings of a human circus member instead of launching a massive protest against the devastating and unfair punishments inflicted upon the like intelligent humans should.

    While the rapist Jerry Sandusky is already in jail to pay for his crime and Penn State is fined $60 million for the cover up, the NCAA President Mark Emmert was dictatorial enough to inflict punishment on the innocent Penn State students by ordering to wiped away 14 years of their victories and ordered Penn State out of the postseason for four years, and will cap scholarships at 20 below the normal limit for four years.

    A teacher , Mark Berndt, in Miramonte Elementary School in Los Angeles was found to have committed lewd acts on 23 students who were blind-folded and fed with his semen smeared on cookies and spoons and some of his lewd acts were caught on photos dated back to 2005 and there was evidence of the school covering up his criminal acts.

    Did the California Education Authority order to vacate the grades earned by any or all students in Miramonte Elementary School in Los Angeles for the past 8 years like the NCAA vacate the victories earned by the students in Penn State for the past 14 years?
    Did the California Education Authority order Miramonte Elementary School out of government funded extra-curricular activities and cut funding to the school?
    NO, IT DID NOT.

    Did the NFL order to vacate all the victories of the Lakers after Kobe Bryant was arrested for raping a 19 year old woman working for a hotel in Colorado?
    NO, IT DID NOT because Kobe Bryant was rich enough to settle the case out of court.

    Many Catholic priests were found guilty in court for molesting and raping little boys and girls.
    Did the Pope of the Catholic Church vacate all the sacraments and rites of baptism received by church members and ex-church members conducted by the convicted priests?
    Did the Pope of the Catholic church forbids all members from the churches of those convicted priests to become altar boys or choir members?
    NO, HE DID NOT.

    People with commonsense and sense of justice all know that only the guilty should be punished. It is a travesty of justice to punish the innocent and the victims of crimes just because the innocent and the victims were under the authority of the those criminals.

    The punishment that the dictatorial NCAA President Mark Emmert imposed on the innocent students of Penn State University is a blatant violation of justice and the civil rights of the Penn States students some of whom are victims of rape by the Penn State assistant coach.

    If similar injustice happens to an institution with predominately black or Hispanic members, the blacks and Hispanics would surely rise up in protest until the injustice is vanquished.

    Are the white students in Penn State too conditioned to a slavish mentality in this age reverse racism that they would accept the unjust punishment imposed on them by a flunky of reverse racism who would sacrifice the civil rights of the innocent and the victims of his own race to please the non-white racists who support his devious actions?

    If a lawsuit is not brought against the dictatorial NCAA President Mark Emmert to over turn this gross injustice, I really see no hope for the white people today in America nor for their children.

    July 24th, 2012 6:05 pm

  44. Chris from Santa Rosa

    Hi Dave, I appreciate your reasoned responses regarding a very hot and emotional issue. That being said. I would argue that when the administration and the athletic department (specifically the football program) of Penn State conspired to cover up the crimes of Jerry Sandusky, they became criminal enterprises.

    Take a moment to reflect on that. The Penn State football program became a criminal enterprise . I don’t think the NCAA had any choice but to penalize Penn State.

    July 24th, 2012 6:26 pm

  45. Simon

    Corrections:
    … instead of launching a massive protest against the devastating and unfair punishments inflicted upon (them) like intelligent humans should.
    Did the Pope of the Catholic church (forbid) all members from the churches of those convicted priests to become altar boys or choir members?

    July 25th, 2012 12:29 am

  46. Simon

    (Update)

    Sue NCAA President Mark Emmert for Violation of the Civil Rights of Penn State Students

    It is sickening to see the predominantly Caucasian college students in Penn State University behaving like a bunch of slavish animals in shock after they had been whipped by a dictatorial circus owner for the wrong doings of a human circus member instead of launching a massive protest against the devastating and unfair punishments inflicted upon them like intelligent humans should.

    While the rapist Jerry Sandusky is already in jail to pay for his crime and Penn State is fined $60 million for the cover up, the NCAA President Mark Emmert was dictatorial enough to inflict punishment on the innocent Penn State students by ordering to wiped away 14 years of their victories and ordered Penn State out of the postseason for four years, and will cap scholarships at 20 below the normal limit for four years.

    A teacher, Mark Berndt, in Miramonte Elementary School in Los Angeles was found to have committed lewd acts on 23 students who were blind-folded and fed with his semen smeared on cookies and spoons and some of his lewd acts were caught on photos dated back to 2005 and there was evidence of the school covering up his criminal acts.

    Did the California Education Authority order to vacate the grades earned by any or all students in Miramonte Elementary School in Los Angeles for the past 8 years like the NCAA vacate the victories earned by the students in Penn State for the past 14 years?
    Did the California Education Authority order Miramonte Elementary School out of government funded extra-curricular activities and cut funding to the school?
    NO, IT DID NOT. Instead of receiving punishment for the crime of the bad teacher, the students received free counseling for copping with the trauma caused by the crime.

    Did the NFL order to vacate all the victories of the Lakers after Kobe Bryant was arrested for raping a 19 year old woman working for a hotel in Colorado?
    NO, IT DID NOT because Kobe Bryant was rich enough to settle the case out of court.

    Many Catholic priests were found guilty in court for molesting and raping little boys and girls.
    Did the Pope of the Catholic Church vacate all the sacraments and rites of baptism received by church members and ex-church members conducted by the convicted priests?
    Did the Pope of the Catholic church forbid all members from the churches of those convicted priests to become altar boys or choir members?
    NO, HE DID NOT.

    People with commonsense and sense of justice all know that only the guilty should be punished. It is a travesty of justice to punish the innocent and the victims of crimes just because the innocent and the victims were under the authority of the those criminals.

    The punishment that the dictatorial NCAA President Mark Emmert imposed on the innocent students of Penn State University is a blatant violation of justice and the civil rights of the Penn States students some of whom are victims of rape by the Penn State assistant coach.

    If similar injustice happens to an institution with predominately black or Hispanic members, the blacks and Hispanics would surely rise up in protest until the injustice is vanquished.

    Are the white students in Penn State too conditioned to a slavish mentality in this age reverse racism that they would accept the unjust punishment imposed on them by a flunky of reverse racism who would sacrifice the civil rights of the innocent and the victims of his own race to please the non-white racists and white apologists who support his devious actions?

    If a lawsuit is not brought against the dictatorial NCAA President Mark Emmert to overturn this gross injustice of political correctness run amok or this gross injustice is allowed to stay in spite of the lawsuit with no further actions to seek justice, I really see no hope for the white Americans today nor for their children.

    July 25th, 2012 1:10 am

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