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You Zohners have carried on a fascinating, civilized debate about Penn State on this blog. I’d like to ask a question to further motivate discussion. Here’s the deal. Some of you, with just cause, are against the idea of the NCAA punishing PSU football when, in a sense, this was not a football crime. It was a flat-out crime. Some of you say the NCAA should have kept its nose out of this sad affair and left it to the courts.

Here are my questions: How would you feel if the NCAA did nothing? Would you have written it should have taken an action?

I pointed this out in a comment but I’ll repeat it here. PSU did not object to the punishment levied by the NCAA.

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Comments

45 Comments

  1. Tiburon Dave

    Thank you Lowell for providing this forum…

    Dave T…in 50 logic based words or fewer…please tell us what you believe to be the appropriate penalty that the people of Pennsylvania should have levied on the university that bears their name?

    Additionally, please tell us which public official you would make responsible for enforcement…

    50 words or fewer please…

    July 24th, 2012 9:25 am

  2. Michael

    We need to remember that the NCAA reserved the right to levy further penalties as evidence arises. This is not over.

    The penalty is weak. I was disappointed that the program was not shut down. USF shut down the basketball program because a player assaulted a student among other academic violations going on. How is this not 100 times worse? I dont buy the argument that this is worse than the death penalty. Ask anyone on death row

    July 24th, 2012 9:48 am

  3. RednGold1

    Did you catch Desmond Howard on ESPN yesterday? Appearing as a college football spokesperson/commentator for ESPN.

    He said some will say the players now are suffering for the sins of people gone.

    Then Howard says the players now have a choice. A player can play at Penn St. Get his education and go on w/ his life.

    Or a player that wants more can transfer. (To a school that has post season, higher profile, etc.

    Then Howard emphasizes the “Choice” factor.

    The players have a choice.

    But the victims, the kids, did not have a choice.

    They were bullied. Their lack of maturity, their fear was exploited.

    Desmond Howard’s words were moving and unexpected.

    July 24th, 2012 9:56 am

  4. Raffaele

    Sick to my stomach.

    If the NCAA did nothing I would be truly ill. That group could not totally ignore the ugliness and had to take action. Doing nothing would have been dreadful.

    July 24th, 2012 10:21 am

  5. John Sousa

    Okay, so maybe the NCAA doesn’t strictly have “jurisdiction” over these types of criminal activities.

    However, the reasons given for USC’s sanctions and Ohio State’s sanctions were because of Lack of Institutional Control. Because someone bought Reggie Bush a house and some kids traded jerseys for tattoos.

    What Paterno and the AD and President did was so much worse.

    Oh, they can’t play in bowl games? Paterno had wins vacated? I read a good one yesterday, “Joe Paterno is turning the other way in his grave.”

    Institutions need to be held accountable. The NCAA was able to do this, and it was good. Maybe the Church will be next.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/25/us/philadelphia-church-official-to-be-sentenced-in-abuse-case.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

    July 24th, 2012 10:36 am

  6. B-Rad

    “Some of you…are against the idea of the NCAA punishing PSU when …this was not
    a football crime. It was a flat out crime.
    How would you feel if the NCAA did nothing?
    Would you have written that it should have taken an action?”

    Of course I would have written that it should have taken an action!
    Just to be contrary and to disagree with you!
    I’ve got nothing better to do with my time than that!

    Child molesters are penalized by the criminal justice system as Sandusky
    knows only too well now. Financial considerations will be determined
    by the civil courts as Mrs. Sandusky and likeky Mrs. Paterno will find
    out. If the location of the crimes is determined to be complicit as well,
    be it a school, church, department store, hospital or what have you, civil
    lawsuits will undoubtedly be filed against it as well.

    July 24th, 2012 11:32 am

  7. Stan

    I strongly disagree with what you said on Comcast…what Penn State got was NOT even close to being worse then the death penalty. I’m shocked you would say that. The program should have been shut down for years. Not as it stands now..that fans will fill that stadium and cheer for Penn State in September,only 6 weeks from now.
    The public doesn’t get it..the whole institution of Penn State is responsible. Every recruit to student has to feel the repercussions.
    The NCAA did do something. They proved that the all mighty dollar is no.1.

    July 24th, 2012 11:40 am

  8. Stan

    .And I was right..I said Penn State will play this year. I know people,and I know how greed runs this country.

    July 24th, 2012 11:41 am

  9. CohnZohn

    Stan, Cool down. I said on Comcast I always was in favor of the death penalty. I said, in a way, what happened could be worse, but I would have preferred the death penalty.

    July 24th, 2012 11:50 am

  10. Tiburon Dave

    Stan…your position is both clear and passionate…

    What do you think about the $60 million?

    $60 million that the advocates for abused children don’t get if you shut the program down…that was compelling for me…your thoughts?

    July 24th, 2012 11:57 am

  11. KauaiRobert

    I was actually finished with this conversation…but since you asked…my answer is an emphatic no.
    .
    The NCAA overstepped in a major way, if you ask me.
    .
    Of course Penn St didn’t object to the punishment.
    .
    If they didn’t, it would’ve been even worse.
    .
    If you’re spanking your kid and you tell him to stop crying or else he’ll get more, he’ll probably try real hard to stop crying.
    .
    (FYI–We never spanked our kids.)
    .
    It seems to me that Jerry Sandusky’s victim list keeps growing larger and larger every day.
    .
    My question to you Lowell is this: Why would anyone want to keep creating more victims–aren’t there enough already???
    .
    .
    .
    *ALOHA*

    July 24th, 2012 12:02 pm

  12. StevenG

    I would be fine with it. Sandusky was found guilty on 45 of the 48 charges. Paterno was fired. So was school president Graham Spanier. Senior vice president Gary Schultz and athletic director Tim Curley were charged with grand jury perjury and failure to report suspected child abuse. Should there be a conspiracy charge in there somewhere? I don’t know, but I think that punishment under criminal law, the strictest in the land, should be sufficient.

    July 24th, 2012 12:03 pm

  13. Dr. Feelgood

    This mess does not help the doctor feel very good at all.
    The NCAA sanctions seem reasonable. There was no rush to judgment; it waited for the facts and the perpetrators to be established by professional investigators. Whatever shortcomings the NCAA has, the worst thing it could have done was make a grandstand show of premature “remedy”, wisely letting this run its course and then taking action based upon facts established in a court of law.
    We can debate endlessly whether the punishment fit the crime. My feeling is that a crippled football program is better than a “disappeared” program for four years. PSU needs to learn some new lessons, some humility, and re-think some priorities. Their community urgently needs the catharsis that will evolve over the next years when the football mania gets extracted, as would a rotten molar, every game-day. They’re going to have to live with defeat while coming to grips with the horrors that they, collectively, inflicted upon children.
    The issue is not the NCAA, The issue is Penn State and what they do to rehabilitate their honor, what they do to correct their leadership principles, how they realign their priorities, and especially if , how, and when they reach out to the abused individuals to begin the real healing.

    July 24th, 2012 12:05 pm

  14. Dave T

    @ Tiburon Dave

    The appropriate penalties are as follows:

    Sandusky received his via the courts.
    Paterno, Spanier and Curly, have received theirs and will continue to do so via courts and civil suits.

    University should be punished per the legal means provided by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, civil and criminal.

    47 words my friend.

    July 24th, 2012 12:12 pm

  15. Dave T

    The NCAA felt compelled to act and I do not blame them. What took place is an atrocity. I do not think that they should have done anything further than place them on probabtion and strict regulatory items, requiring high documentation of all activities. The lack of their control was a failure to report something that was given to them second handed and then choosing not to disclose it. That is a failure indeed and there is no dispute of that. But it simply did not involve student-athletes or even Penn State students or contact with students and that is the issue involved here.

    I ask this, with this level of punishment for a completely non student-athlete related issue, what happens when there is a strong student-athlete related issue? What happens if a booster decides to implement a “pay for pain” bounty type program? (Are we naive enough to think it does not already exist?) And this is discovered. Now you are dealing with players, coaches, boosters and directly potentially changing careers and lives, where does the NCAA go here? Potentially felenous, malicious acts committed with intent. Same type penalty? Higher because committed on field? Less because less “heinous” than what took place in State College? This is the corner that the NCAA has now painted themselves into with their decision. That is why I feel they have vastly overstepped their scope here. That is the issue at hand. Not just that they have said they themselves are higher or equal to a criminal and civil court system in the Commonwealth of PA, but that they now leave themselves little options when dealing with true issues that violate NCAA infractions.

    Again, I am not in any way saying Penn State should go unpunished for their lack of handling this situation, they should, but it needs to be handled by appropriate authorities and in this particular case, that is not the NCAA.

    July 24th, 2012 12:25 pm

  16. Dave T

    Lowell, please repost this, corrections made.

    The NCAA felt compelled to act and I do not blame them. What took place is an atrocity. I do not think that they should have done anything further than place them on probabtion and strict regulatory items, requiring high documentation of all activities. The lack of their control was a failure to report something that was given to them second handed and then choosing not to disclose it. That is a failure indeed and there is no dispute of that. But it simply did not involve student-athletes or even Penn State students or contact with students and that is the issue involved here.

    I ask this, with this level of punishment for a completely non student-athlete related issue, what happens when there is a strong student-athlete related issue? What happens if a booster decides to implement a “pay for pain” bounty type program? (Are we naive enough to think it does not already exist?) And this is discovered. Now you are dealing with players, coaches, boosters and directly potentially changing careers and lives, where does the NCAA go here? Potentially felonous, malicious acts committed with intent. Same type of penalty? Higher because committed on field? Less because are less “heinous” than what took place in State College? This is the corner that the NCAA has now painted themselves into with their decision. That is why I feel they have vastly overstepped their scope here. That is the issue at hand. Not just that they have said they themselves are higher or equal to a criminal and civil court system in the Commonwealth of PA, but that they now leave themselves little options when dealing with true issues that violate NCAA guidelines.

    Again, I am not in any way saying Penn State should go unpunished for their lack of handling this situation, they should, but it needs to be handled by appropriate authorities and in this particular case, that is not the NCAA.

    July 24th, 2012 12:29 pm

  17. Dennis

    I would be fine with it. This was a crime. The cover up is a crime. Punish the people who commited the crime. Like KauaiRobert said, the NCAA just created more victims of the crime.

    Stan’s passion aside, you are not going to make this go away by punishing people who did not even know it was happening, let alone had anything to do with it and the cover up.

    July 24th, 2012 12:44 pm

  18. Dennis

    One more thing – I am comforted by knowing that in this country we are all innocent until proven guilty. That we are responsible for the crimes we commit . That we are not respsonsible for the crimes of others, especially when we are not aware that they are committing crimes. Until now.

    July 24th, 2012 12:51 pm

  19. Dave T

    To Lowell and my fellow contributors here I pose this set of questions: Do you think that Congress and the Feds overstepped when they went after and essentially failed to get any kind of conviction with Bonds, Clemmens and Armstrong. Did they overstep their bounds? Should any punishment have been left strictly to their governing body (MLB and WCI respectively)? And should it ultimately be proven that the Saints players did in fact attempt to injure or injure a player on purpose, should the State of Louisiana step in or the state at which the game was played step in and prosecute? Or should the NFL simply govern this matter?

    I am curious to the response here. Because in each of my examples massive coverups or alleged cover ups took place. The difference is that the crimes committed by Sandusky are far more visceral and heinous.

    July 24th, 2012 1:01 pm

  20. Tiburon Dave

    Ok…the concensus of the anti NCAA involvement group appears to be “hang the guys with the names on the door and leave the rest alone”…

    Thanks for your concise response Dave T…I also sat through NCAA compliance meetings as a D1 student athlete long ago…I agree they were a mostly a sham…

    With this shared experience perhaps you will agree that a powerful athletic program is more about the fat cat alums who are the power behind the thrones of the guys with names on the door…should they be allowed to scurry under the nearest appliance when trouble comes or should they also pay a price through a hit to their precious program?

    Far too many words but please indulge me…

    July 24th, 2012 1:04 pm

  21. NP

    One of the KNBR traffic guys yesterday put it best when he said this happens all the time. A father commits a crime and he goes to jail, but there’s all kinds of other collateral damage from the kids no longer having a father to losing financial support. But that doesn’t mean you do nothing. It stinks that there are further victims because of the punishment, but blame Jerry Sandusky, blame Paterno, blame the university officials and others who allowed a football program to become bigger than the university. Don’t blame the NCAA.

    Seriously, I’m sorry that kids will suffer because they couldn’t go to Penn State to play football due to fewer scholarships. But come on, if that’s the problem go play somewhere else. Blame Penn State for losing the scholarships-revenue-etc. it’s their fault

    July 24th, 2012 1:06 pm

  22. NP

    And you’re crazy if you think this is just a criminal issue where the NCAA has nothing to do with it. It has everything to do with it. You think this happens in the political science department at Penn State where a tenured teacher sexually abuses young kids and a vast cover-up occurs? Get your heads out of the sand. This is a textbook case of losing institutional control.

    July 24th, 2012 1:10 pm

  23. Lo Sbandato

    The bigger question is, does it make any difference in the long- or even mid-term? Humans seem genetically immune to learning from others’ errors. History repeats not because of ignorance but because people say to themselves “I’m not as stupid as those morons. I won’t fail.” Postseason bans, recruiting restrictions, even “death penalties”, have done little to curb corrupt behavior in college sports. If the NCAA is going to ride in on their white charger, why not go all out and give the program the axe? Why not a policy of zero tolerance?

    Frankly, I like the idea of decreeing no tuition increases for a certain number of years. That’d certainly put the Bunsen burner under the admins to stay vigilant about what’s going on in the sports programs.

    July 24th, 2012 1:10 pm

  24. Stan

    Six weeks. In six weeks,hundreds of thousands will cheer for Penn State football,they will still be televised,and popcorn and soda and beer will be consumed. Wheres the penalty?..where?

    Penn State in six weeks will be as good as 90% of the programs in this country..still favored to whip Cal. Better then San Jose state or UC Davis.

    Where is the penalty? for rape of children..4 bowl games? ALL MIGHTY DOLLAR,LORD OF FOOTBALL WE WORSHIP YOU.
    Just sickening.

    July 24th, 2012 1:25 pm

  25. Dave T

    @Tiburon Dave, I absolutely agree that in far too many instances Boosters and “Programs” hold sway over schools and administrations. I think that is undoubtedly an issue. I just believe like some of my fellow contributors here, that the NCAA has stepped outside their boundaries here. Take a moment and think about the questions I posed regarding a bounty type situation for a moment. A direct issue regarding athletics. Where does the NCAA go? If I am a player that is targeted, injured and my life is forever changed (conussion, brain damage, blown knees or perhaps paralysis even) am I truly any different than those affected by Sandusky? My life has been unalterably changed by another player, who was “sponsored” to take me out of a game. Now the NCAA has to act and swiftly and with a mind to what they just imposed. Now what if not an isolated incident within that program? 4 years enough now? 8? That is the danger of the precedent set here.

    July 24th, 2012 1:26 pm

  26. lameduck

    The question that’s sticking out to me is was this a football crime? If so then the NCAA has jurisdiction, if not they don’t. I’m ready for the heat, but I think it was a football crime because the coaches were allowed to continue in their roles and produce wins while the cover up occurred. The coaches are a part of the game, too.

    July 24th, 2012 1:29 pm

  27. Stan

    eh-delete that last and this one. Even i’m tired of arguing ..

    July 24th, 2012 1:40 pm

  28. StevenG

    @Stan – The point I’m making is that football didn’t rape 4 children. Sandusky did. Paterno covered it up. Those two men coached football. That’s the extent that football is involved in this. After that, two administrators covered it up. There shouldn’t be a penalty from the NCAA because isn’t an athletics issue. It’s a criminal issue that is best handled by the courts. The question I posed on the CohnZone’s blog yesterday: do you believe the NCAA should punish a university when a coach/player is convicted of a DUI? Because that’s the new standard set by the NCAA.

    July 24th, 2012 4:38 pm

  29. Tetsuo the Bullet Man

    There’s really no question of “jurisdiction” here. Penn State is, with a small caveat, a voluntary member of the NCAA, and has thereby agreed to acknowledge its authority. It may not be a “football” crime, but the crimes (including the conspiracy to keep it quiet) were committed by employees of the athletic department. So what is the impediment to the NCAA doling out punishment in this case?

    July 24th, 2012 5:01 pm

  30. StevenG

    The impediment is the extent of the NCAA’s authority within its jurisdiction. The police have the authority to ticket me for speeding or arrest me for assault, but they don’t have the authority to tell me what TV shows to watch or what food to eat. The NCAA does not have authority to penalize Penn State in this case and yet the NCAA just set a precedent that criminal activity perpetrated by an athletic employee of the university may lead to disciplinary action against the entire university. So the next DUI a coach gets should lead to a fine against the university and a forfeiture of all wins that occurred during the time in which the coach was drunk.

    July 24th, 2012 5:26 pm

  31. Stan

    SteveG-
    You and others -including Lowell,miss the point of the death penalty-something a school with any morals would do voluntarily- and that point is that the shutting down of the very reason for the crimes against children and humanity-what it also was- Football- and it SHOULD hurt..as the school, the WHOLE school, was part of the culture of fostering football at any cost.
    As it is Steve..the school isn’t being punished anywhere’s close to what is right. Penn State acted as a whole,and the punishment is just for some…fans still get to cheer,coaches coach..players play.
    The 60 million is one years income from football..or less. And no doubt the school just passes along the cost in tuition or to taxpayers. Everything gets passed..THAT’S why the death penalty was what should have been done. It should have hurt..not just upset. The death penalty makes a strong statement. Fines? reduction from 25 to 15 scholarships?..that’s more perverse reasoning from that school. I would never go by what they accept.

    July 24th, 2012 5:28 pm

  32. Dennis

    So if this happened in the Science department and some head guy who was bringing in a lot of research dollars covers up a similar scandal for the same reasons and the administration does exactly like it did with Paterno, should the NCAA come in and shut down the football program? Do they have jurisdiction?

    July 24th, 2012 6:05 pm

  33. Jack Hammer

    RednGold hit the bulls eye on this one. The “student-athletes” that play football at Penn State currently, and the future recruits have a choice. They can choose to stay, or they can choose to leave. The victims had no choice. They were taken advantage of.

    I would have liked to have seen that $60m fine carried throughout the entire term of the sanctions. That would have really made the impact necessary on the university.

    July 24th, 2012 6:05 pm

  34. Tetsuo the Bullet Man

    Dennis – Does that have anything to do with football or athletics? No? Then why would the NCAA be involved? The question is completely irrelevant.

    StevenG – Besides the absurdity of equating a DUI conviction with the ongoing abuse of children and the criminal conspiracy to cover it up, your statement about the cops can’t tell what TV shows to watch is irrelevant. The NCAA is concerned with athletics. Wrongdoing in the athletic department is what they’re supposed to be monitoring and punishing. Why would criminal activity somehow be excluded from that? Some of the criminal activity happened on school property, did it not? So how is the NCAA overreaching here?

    The DUI argument is also weak because there is the option for self-governance for NCAA members. Those incidents are usually dealt with internally. The authorities at Penn State clearly abdicated those responsibilities and surrendered that right.

    As for “punishing the whole university”, is the athletics department not an integral part of the university? Or is that only when good things are happening? It’s the football program being fined. That affects the entire university, sure, but the university also reaps all the benefits when the football team was considered a model program. Why should they be insulated from the fallout of negative events?

    Again, Penn State is a voluntary member of the NCAA, they can leave any time they like if they don’t like the way they’re being treated. Clearly, they’re not and they don’t.

    July 24th, 2012 11:00 pm

  35. Lo Sbandato

    It’s hilarious that the accounting charade of “vacating wins” is viewed as any kind of punishment.
    John Calipari has had seasons expunged at two different schools. He’s a multimillionaire who would have his pick of jobs if he chose to leave his current one.
    His current school, Kentucky, has more convictions than most Mafia dons, with their own history of erased seasons, and they’re the reigning national champions gearing up for another ruin at a title.
    How could vacated wins mean anything to anybody but pedantic stat geeks? It’s not like any of the actual events of those seasons have been altered. It’s certainly never affected future events.

    July 24th, 2012 11:29 pm

  36. Sean Nolan

    Not guilty or untried individuals are punished as deterrents (for the general good). It’s the dirty little secret undermining the supposed sanctity of individual rights. Who knew football could become another Melville’s Billy Budd?

    July 25th, 2012 12:59 am

  37. Dennis

    Tetsue, the crime that was committed and the cover up had nothing to do with atheletics either and that is the point. Paterno was trying to protect a friend not the football program. What happend had nothing to do with the football program other than the people involved worked in the football program. So what.

    If Paterno robbed a bank, would the NCAA have jurisdiction? Would they penalize the football program? What we are talking about is a criminal issue not a football issue.

    July 25th, 2012 9:29 am

  38. KauaiRobert

    Dennis:
    .
    I’m in total agreement.
    .
    However, many people don’t see this situation the same way we do.
    .
    We need to agree to disagree with them and move on.
    .
    One thing we can ALL agree on though is that Sandusky should and will burn for this.
    .
    .
    .
    *ALOHA*

    July 25th, 2012 9:50 am

  39. StevenG

    @Dennis – Well said.

    @Tetsuo the Bullet Man – It is absurd, that’s why I chose the example, but that doesn’t make it irrelevant. A DUI (or Paterno bank robbery) is appropriately equated to rape in this case because they are both crimes that are unrelated to football. There’s no competitive football advantage to either crime, so as you said previously: “Does that have anything to do with football or athletics? No? Then why would the NCAA be involved? The question is completely irrelevant.”

    You are correct that the NCAA monitors wrongdoing in the athletic departments, but they do not blanket authority to monitor all wrongdoing of any kind (thus my TV example). They monitor things like gifts to players or betting on games. Issues that affect fair play or create competitive advantage and are related to the game.

    Also, whether a school chooses to abdicate their rights doesn’t address whether that’s decision is a good one. I disagree with the NCAA for acting and I disagree with Penn State for allowing the NCAA to intervene.

    July 25th, 2012 10:26 am

  40. Tetsuo the Bullet Man

    Dennis, he wasn’t trying to protect the football program? Are you serious? “People working in the football” program is totally what the NCAA is about. If Paterno robbed a bank, and Penn State failed as an institution to deal with the situation, then yes, the NCAA would act? If these athletic department employee and their schools are happy to take the plaudits from the NCAA, why are they suddenly outside their jurisdiction when bad thing happen. (BTW, I notice you dropped the ridiculous “science department” irrelevancy).

    Sandusky used his position with a nationally renowned football program to meet and abuse these boys (I also notice no counterargument to the fact that some of these heinous activities occurred on school property AND school-sponsored trips with the football team). How can it “have nothing to do with football”? Why is it all over the sports pages instead of restricted to the police blotter? It’s a criminal issue AND a football issue. There is yet to be presented a defensible argument why the two should somehow be separated in this case.

    July 25th, 2012 12:50 pm

  41. Stan

    Dennis..you leave out that the coaches,the school President,the AD, a few trustee’s and the campus police all ignored the abuse. SO it pervaded the very top. Even some big donators knew Sandusky was banned from the school..yet,there he was. He even attended school banquets he was unworried about anything being revealed.

    If the death penalty wasn’t invoked on Penn State..then it never will be invoked. What is cheating with payoffs in comparison now?

    July 25th, 2012 1:32 pm

  42. Johnc

    The coverup intricately involves the head football coach ,his former assistant,the Athletic Director, a Vice President of Finance and the President of the university . Penn State benefited for 15 years from a squeaky clean collegiate sports image. They were the model football institution extolled throughout the nation for high graduation rates and lack of NCAA recruiting infractions. Prevailing over this era of the squeaky clean image Headcoach Saint Joe Pa, the patron saint of Penn St was immortalised in a bronze statue at the entrance of the coliseum where his gladiators would fight and generate in $60 million cash annually for the University coffers. Football there is the cash cow..the golden calf if you will.

    So yes the NCAA should get involved. I say they had an obligation to assert themselves because the felony coverup was connected to those in charge of Penn State athletics and the University.
    Did the NCAA overstep its bounds? Did they go far enough? I don’t know because I don’t know what their mandate is or what their jurisdictional reach allows.

    I would have preferred that the Football program be abolished. The collateral damage to those not involved is part of life. Get over it. Get back to getting an education. To me the University being dependent on the revenue of the Football program is no different than a student financing his tuition by gambling on horses at the race track.

    July 26th, 2012 12:08 am

  43. Stan

    Anybody notice how easily Sandusky took to being imprisoned? I thought for sure his lawyer would tie this case up in the legal mumbo jumbo for a couple of years. Its like Sandusky is of the Sirhan Sirhan or Charles Manson type..can live in prison for decades,no suicide watch ever needed.

    July 26th, 2012 10:28 am

  44. Stan

    I saw a long shot view of the Paterno statue’s background…it was very similar to the Vietnam memorial wide “V” shape. Just more of football is life and death to Penn State.

    July 26th, 2012 6:03 pm

  45. StevenG

    One of the victims just sued Penn State. That $60m sure would come in handy now…

    July 27th, 2012 12:15 pm

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